Hanging Ten: Having both feet on the front end of the board with all of the surfer’s toes off the edge. This is also known as noseriding. This term was first made famous by James (Rip) Carman, straight off the early Californian surfing beaches.

Hanging Five: Having one foot near the front of the board, toes off the edge.

Cutback: This refers to generating speed down the line, then turning up the face to reverse direction. It effectively slows the rider down to keep up with slower wave sections that appear after a fast section (a drop in, for example).

Floater: This refers to popping up on the lip of the wave, then coming down with the lip. This procedure can be used at the end of a wave when a wave section is closing out. It is extremely easy and popular to do on small waves.

Top-Turn: This is a simple turn off the top of the wave. This move is sometimes used to generate speed, and sometimes, to shoot spray.

Air / Aerial: This refers to popping up over the lip into the air. There are many types of air or aerials, including ollies, method airs, lien airs, and skateboard airs.

Regular / Natural Foot: The right foot on back of board

Goofy Foot: —the left foot on back of board

Take-Off: The start of a ride
Drop In: Dropping into, or engaging the wave. This procedure is most often part of standing up on the board.

Snaking, Drop In On, Cut Off, or “Burn”: Note that each of these terms have a someone negative connotation. This procedure refers to taking off on a wave in front of someone that is closer to the peak. It is a procedure that’s largely considered inappropriate and inconsiderate.

Hanging Ten and Hanging Five are moves usually specific to longboarding. Hanging Ten refers to having both feet on the front end of the board with all of the surfer’s toes off the edge, also known as nose – riding. Hanging Five is having just one foot near the front, toes off the edge. Hanging Ten was first made famous by James (Rip) Carman from the early Californian surfing beaches.

Cutback: Generating speed down the line and then turning up the face to reverse direction. Has the effect of slowing the rider down to keep up with slower wave sections that appear after a fast section, for example a drop in.

Floater: Popping up on the lip of the wave and coming down with the lip. Can be used at the end of a wave when the wave section is closing out. Very easy and popular on small waves.

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